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UK Pet Passport – Bringing Pets to the UK (GB 2022 Regulations)

When bringing pets to the UK, strict rules apply. The rules for bringing pets to Great Britain (England, Wales and Scotland) are different to bringing pets to Ireland, as Ireland is still part of the EU. In this article we will discuss the rules and regulations to get a UK Pet Passport to bring pets to GB. 

Getting a UK Pet Passport to bring pets to the UK (GB) in 2022 is easy and will just take 4 simple steps:

    1. Check if you can bring your pet to GB – you can enter or return to GB with your pet dog, cat or ferret if (1) it has been microchipped, (2) has a pet passport or health certificate and (3) if it has been vaccinated against rabies. You will also require a blood test if you are traveling from an unlisted country.
    2. Get your pet microchipped – you can get your pet microchipped at the vet. This will be a quick appointment. More information on this to follow. 
    3. Get your pet vaccinated against rabies – your dog, cat or ferret will require a rabies vaccination before traveling to GB. More information on this to follow. 
    4. Get a pet travel document – the documents required depend on where you are travelling from. There are ‘Part 1’ listed countries, ‘Part 2’ listed countries and unlisted countries. The rules for each vary. More information on this to follow. 

Dogs may also require tapeworm treatment unless you are traveling directly from Finland, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Malta or Norway. 

We will discuss all of the above in detail below. 


What is a UK Pet Passport for GB?

‘UK Pet Passport’ is a term used to describe the documents that are required to travel to the UK with a pet. Customs officials will need to see these documents in order to clear your pet. Essentially, a pet passport demonstrates that your pet is fit and healthy to travel. With a Pet Passport for GB, in most circumstances, your pet will not have to face a lengthly quarantine period. 

Generally, dogs, cats and ferrets will require a microchip, rabies vaccination, parasite treatment (dogs only) and either a Pet Passport or an animal health certificate. However, if you are traveling from a country GB considers to be high-risk for rabies, your dog, cat or ferret will also need a rabies titer test. If you are bringing pets to the UK for commercial reasons, or if you are traveling to the UK with a pet other than a dog, cat or ferret, you will need an import permit. The regulations differ for other pet species, we will discuss this below. 


What does a UK Pet Passport contain?

A UK Pet Passport (GB) contains all the documents required to enter GB with your pet. Essentially, it will prove that your pet is fit and healthy enough to travel. Pet Passports are required to ensure imported pets don’t pose as a health threat to other animals.

A Pet Passport UK (GB) can contain any of the following information:

  1. Details of ownership (name, address, passport number, telephone, etc.)
  2. Description of the animal (name, species, breed, date of birth, etc.)
  3. Official veterinarian’s details
  4. Rabies vaccination certificate
  5. Microchip details
  6. Health certificate
  7. Parasite treatment records
  8. Additional vaccinations recorded and treatment records
  9. An optional photo
  10. Rabies antibody titer test results

UK pet passport for dogs, cats and ferrets will usually contain those listed 1-6 at minimum. Those listed 7-10 are potential requirements that your pet may need, if you are traveling from a high-risk rabies country, or if you are traveling with other pet species. We will go into more detail below.

All records must be signed and stamped by your official veterinarian with official stickers from the medication used.


How do I get a UK Pet Passport?

RESEARCH

Check that your pet is able to travel with you. 

There are specific requirements for different species entering GB. Generally, dogs, cats and ferrets will require the following:

  • Microchip
  • Rabies Vaccination
  • Tapeworm Treatment (dogs only)
  • Pet Passport OR Animal Health Certificate

For detailed information on the requirements of bringing pets to the UK, check the requirements section below.

For more details on specific requirements for different species skip to the ‘What are species-specific requirements for a UK Pet Passport?‘ section.

VISIT YOUR VET

Dogs, cats and ferrets will need a microchip and rabies vaccination. All pets will also require an animal health certificate (AHC), if you do not have a pet passport issued before January 2021. If you are traveling from a ‘List 1’ or ‘List 2’ country, you will only need one vet visit. 

When booking the appointment, inform your vet where you and your pet are heading to, so they can prepare your pet’s vaccinations. 

Only dogs, cats and ferrets require a microchip and rabies vaccination. Other pet’s such as rabbits, rodents and birds do not require microchipping or vaccinations.

At your appointment, your vet will first administer your pet’s microchip, and then your pet’s rabies vaccination. It is important that they microchip your pet first as the vaccination will not be valid. 

Your vet will then review and stamp all your paperwork. The appointment should take no longer than half an hour.

For more detailed information on the requirements skip to ‘What are the requirements for a Pet Passport UK?‘.

SECOND VET VISIT

Traveling from a ‘List 1’ or ‘List 2’ Country

If you do not have a pet passport, you will need an animal health certificate issued within 10 days of bringing pets to the UK (GB). 

The reason you must book a second vet appointment to obtain your pet’s animal health certificate, is because you must wait 21 days after your pet’s primary rabies vaccination. 

Traveling from an Unlisted Country

In order to bring pets to the UK (GB) from an unlisted country, your pet will require a rabies titer test, or a rabies blood test.

You will need to wait 30 days after your pet’s primary or booster vaccination in order to have a rabies titer test. Once your pet has passed the test, they can enter the UK no sooner than 3 months after the date the blood was drawn.

We will go into more detail in the rabies titer test section below.

APPLY FOR LICENSING & PERMITS

Not all pets will require an import permit. You will not require a permit for bringing dogs, cats and ferrets into Great Britain. You also won’t require permits for bringing pets into GB from the EU. However, you will need to apply for an import license if bringing certain animals into GB from outside the EU

Bringing in Animals from an non-EU Country

In order to bring a pet rodent or rabbit into GB from outside the EU, you will need to get a rabies import license. They will also need to quarantine for 4 months upon arrival. 

You can use form RM01 to apply for a licence to import live animals covered by the Rabies Order (Importation of Dogs, Cats and Other Mammals) 1974. 

The GOV website shares a detailed guide on how to complete the form. 

In order to bring a pet bird into GB, you need to travel from an approved country. You will also require a health certificate and a pet bird import license from the Centre for International Trade in Carlisle. 

Centre for International Trade: Carlisle
imports@apha.gov.uk
Telephone: 03000 200 301
Fax: 0208 0260 498
Find out about call charges

Centre for International Trade: Carlisle
Eden Bridge House
Lowther Street
Carlisle
CA3 8DX

Bringing in Animals from an EU Country

There are no restrictions on bringing pet rabbits, rodents, invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles to GB from EU countries. 

In order to bring a pet bird to GB, from an EU country, you will need a health certificate.


Great Britain – Listed & Unlisted Countries

‘Part 1’ listed countries

Great Britain accepts pet passports or a Great Britain pet health certificate from the following countries (known as Part 1 listed countries):

EU countries, Andorra, Azores and Madeira, Canary Islands, French Guiana, Gibraltar, Greenland and the Faroe Islands, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Martinique, Mayotte (French territory), Monaco, Norway, Réunion (French territory), Saint Barthélemy (French Territory), San Marino, Saint Martin (French part of the island – French territory), Switzerland, Vatican City State

‘Part 2’ listed countries

Great Britain accepts a Great Britain pet health certificate from the following countries (known as Part 2 listed countries):

Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Aruba, Ascension Island, Australia, Bahrain, Barbados, Belarus, Bermuda, BES Islands (Bonair, Saint Eustatius and Saba), Bosnia-Herzegovina, British Virgin Islands, Canada, Cayman Islands, Chile, Curaçao, Falkland Islands, Fiji, French Polynesia, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Japan, Malaysia, Mauritius, Mexico, Montserrat, New Caledonia, New Zealand, North Macedonia, Russian Federation, Saint Maarten, Singapore, St Helena, St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St Pierre and Miquelon, St Vincent and The Grenadines, Taiwan, Trinidad and Tobago, United Arab Emirates, USA (includes American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the US virgin Islands), Vanuatu, Wallis and Futuna.

Great Britain does not accept a pet passport from these countries.

Countries that are not listed

If your country is not listed, you’ll need a Great Britain pet health certificate. Your pet will also have to follow specific rules on rabies, vaccinations and blood tests.


How long does it take to get a Pet Passport UK?

It will take roughly between 1 month and 4 months to get a UK pet passport to bring a pet into the UK. The time depends on where you are traveling from, and the species of your pet.

If traveling to the UK with a dog, cat or ferret from a ‘List 1’ or ‘List 2’ country, you will just need a quick visit to the vet. In this case, your pet will just require a microchip, rabies vaccination and animal health certificate. Dogs may also require a tapeworm treatment administered by a vet, between 1 and 5 days prior to entering GB. Health certificates must be obtained within 10 days of entering GB, and must be endorsed if traveling from the US and Canada.

However, if you are traveling from a country the UK deems as high-risk of rabies, it will take 3 months longer. This is because your dog, cat or ferret will require a rabies titer test to ensure their rabies vaccination was successful. Firstly, you must wait 30 days after your pet’s primary or booster rabies vaccination before taking the rabies titer test. Secondly, you must wait for your pet’s results. Lastly, if your pet passes the rabies titer test, you must wait at least 3 months before entering GB.

To save time, when making an appointment be sure to advise the veterinarian staff that you want to get a pet passport. This will ensure that they have everything required in stock and will allow them time to prepare.


What are the requirements for a bringing a pet to the UK (GB)?

Depending on your pet’s species, age and where you are traveling from, the requirements for bringing a pet to the UK (GB) can be any of the following:

  1. Microchip
  2. Rabies vaccination
  3. Pet Passport or Animal Health certificate
  4. Parasite treatments
  5. Rabies titer test
  6. Permits & licenses

MICROCHIPPING

Dogs, cats and ferrets must be microchipped in order to obtain a UK pet passport for GB. It is also a requirement for entering most countries. Other pet species do not require microchipping. 

A microchip is a permanent method of electronic identification. The chip is around the size of a grain of rice – and is implanted just under your pet’s skin between its shoulder blades. Each chip has a unique number that is detected using a microchip scanner.

Not only is it a requirement to enter GB with a dog, cat or ferret, it is highly recommended your pet is microchipped. This is because if you were to lose your pet while, a microchip makes it far more likely that you will be reunited.

We recommend that microchipping your pet is the first step you take when bringing a pet to the UK (GB). This is because your pet’s rabies vaccination won’t be valid unless your pet is microchipped first.

RABIES VACCINATION

When bringing pets to the UK (GB), all dogs, cats and ferrets must have proof of a current rabies vaccination, administered after a microchip was implanted. The timing of your pet’s rabies vaccination depends on where you are traveling from. Other pet species do not require rabies vaccinations. 

Your pet’s first rabies vaccination is called their primary vaccination and should be a 1 year vaccine unless the manufacturer specifies it as a primary vaccine. if your pet’s primary vaccination expired before you had a chance to apply a booster vaccine, their next vaccine will act as the primary.

Booster vaccines are all vaccines applied after the primary vaccine, as long as it is still valid. Great Britain accepts 3 year rabies vaccinations, but only as a booster vaccine and not a primary.

In order to bring pets to the UK (GB), dogs, cats and ferrets will need their primary vaccination administered no sooner than 21 days before travel. However, there is no waiting period after booster vaccinations as long as:

  • the previous vaccination was administered after a microchip was implanted AND
  • the booster vaccination was administered before the previous vaccination had expired.

Once your pet has entered the UK, a 21 waiting period is not required for any subsequent visits, as long as your pet’s rabies vaccinations are up to date.

Traveling from an unlisted country

You will need to wait 30 days after your dog, cat or ferret’s rabies vaccination, and do a rabies titer test. Please check the rabies titer test section below for more information.

PET PASSPORT OR ANIMAL HEALTH CERTIFICATE (AHC)

You will need either a pet passport or an animal health certificate, depending on where you are traveling from.

If you are traveling from either Northern Ireland, The Channel Islands or The Isle of Man, you will not require this documentation. 

You will need one of the following documents to bring a pet to Great Britain (England, Wales and Scotland):

  • a pet passport, if you’re travelling from a ‘Part 1’ listed country, or if it was issued in Great Britain before 1 January 2021
  • an Animal Health Certificate (AHC) issued in Great Britain – valid up to 4 months after it was issued
  • a Great Britain pet health certificate, if you’re travelling from a ‘Part 2’ or ‘not listed’ country, or a ‘Part 1’ country that does not issue pet passports

You can check whether your departing country is listed as Part 1, Part 2 or if it is unlisted here. 

You can obtain your pet’s pet passport, or AHC at your vet. 

RABIES TITER TEST

If you are bringing pets to the UK (GB) from an unlisted country, your dog, cat or ferret will require a rabies blood test to show that their rabies vaccination was successful. This doesn’t apply to other pet species.

  1. Your pet must have a blood sample taken at least 30 days after the rabies vaccination.
  2. Your vet must then send the blood sample to an approved blood testing laboratory.
  3. Your pet’s blood test results must show a rabies antibody level of at least 0.5 IU/ml.
  4. You must wait 3 months from the date the blood sample was taken before you travel – this doesn’t apply if your pet was vaccinated, blood tested and given a pet passport in the EU before travelling to an unlisted country.
  5. The vet must give you a copy of the test results and enter the day the blood sample was taken in a third-country official veterinary certificate.

TAPEWORM TREATMENT (DOGS ONLY)

In order to get a UK Pet Passport to import pets to GB, dogs will need to be treated against tapeworm.

This doesn’t apply to cats or other pet species. 

This also doesn’t apply if you are traveling directly from Finland, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Malta or Norway.

Your dog must be treated against tapeworms between 24 hours (1 day) and 120 hours (5 days) before entering the UK. If you fail to have your dog treated within this time scale, then he or she may be put into quarantine for up to 4 months.

The tapeworm treatment must be administered by a vet. Over the counter treatments will not be valid.

PERMITS & LICENSES

TRAVELING TO THE UK

Not all pets will require an import permit. You will not require a permit for bringing dogs, cats and ferrets into Great Britain. You also won’t require permits for bringing pets into GB from the EU. However, you will need to apply for an import license if bringing certain animals into GB from outside the EU

Bringing in Animals from an non-EU Country

In order to bring a pet rodent or rabbit into GB from outside the EU, you will need to get a rabies import license. They will also need to quarantine for 4 months upon arrival. 

You can use form RM01 to apply for a licence to import live animals covered by the Rabies Order (Importation of Dogs, Cats and Other Mammals) 1974. 

The GOV website shares a detailed guide on how to complete the form. 

In order to bring a pet bird into GB, you need to travel from an approved country. You will also require a health certificate and a pet bird import license from the Centre for International Trade in Carlisle. 

Centre for International Trade: Carlisle
imports@apha.gov.uk
Telephone: 03000 200 301
Fax: 0208 0260 498
Find out about call charges

Centre for International Trade: Carlisle
Eden Bridge House
Lowther Street
Carlisle
CA3 8DX

Traveling with animals other than dogs, cats and ferrets

Pets other than dogs, cats and ferrets traveling into GB should travel with an import license (form RM01). The following animals are permitted:

uk pet passport permitted animals

You can apply for an import permit by completing this form.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) will use the information you provide on the licence form to decide if any animals you’re importing need to be quarantined.

Contact APHA to find out:

  • if you’re eligible to apply for a licence
  • how long a licence lasts for
  • what happens if you lose your licence

Traveling with protected animal species (CITES)

You will need a CITES permit if you are bringing an animal that is in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora.

If you are traveling with a domestic dog or cat, then you will not need a CITES permit, this is generally just the case for reptiles and parrot species. You can check whether your pet is protected here.

Transit through a high-rabies country

If your pet transits through a high-rabies country, then a Transit Declaration will be required stating that your pet has had no contact with rabies-carrying animals and remained secured within the airplane or airport.


What are species-specific requirements for taking pets to the UK?

TAKING DOGS TO GB

To take dogs to GB you require the following:

  • Microchip
  • Rabies vaccination (1 year and 3 year vaccinations are accepted)
  • Animal health certificate or pet passport
  • Tapeworm treatment

TAKING CATS TO GB

To take cats to GB you require the following:

  • Microchip
  • Rabies vaccination (1 year and 3 year vaccinations are accepted)
  • Animal health certificate or pet passport 

TAKING RODENTS & LAGOMORPHS (RABBITS) TO GB

To take rodents and rabbits to GB you require the following:

  • Health certificate
  • Import permit (RM01 Form)

TAKING RODENTS & LAGOMORPHS (RABBITS) TO GB

To take pet birds to GB you require the following:

  • Health certificate
  • Pet bird import license from the Center for International Trade in Carlisle (traveling from non EU countries only)

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TAKING HORSES TO GB

To take horses to GB you require the following:

  • Health certificate
  • Import permit
  • An EU-approved studbook
  • A national branch of an international body for sporting or competition purposes test
  • Equine infectious anaemia test (within 30 days before travel)
  • Equine viral arteritis test (within 21 days before travel for uncarstrated male equines that are older than 180 days, unless they meet vaccination requirements)

TAKING REPTILES & AMPHIBIANS TO GB

To take pet reptiles and amphibians to GB you require the following:

  • Signed declaration saying the animals are:
    • not for sale
    • fit and healthy
    • able to complete the journey safely

Flying into the UK with a pet

Whether you are flying with your pet or it will be flying without you, it is important to choose an airline that serves the entire route from beginning to end. Before selecting an airline you will need to check their pet policies to ensure that they will allow your pet to fly. Will the airline allow your dog or cat to fly in the cabin with you? What are the restrictions? Will your pet need to travel in the cargo hold? Another option for airline pet travel is by private charter. Although this is more expensive than commercial airlines, pets will fly in the cabin with their owners in luxury, regardless of their size.

BEFORE YOU FLY

You are permitted to bring up to 5 dogs, cats or ferrets with you – if you are planning on bringing more you will need to submit a request to the Import of Products, Animals, Food & Feed System (IPAFFS).

Book your flight with an approved carrier and on an approved route – you can check approved airlines and airports here, and approved sea and rail routes and companies here

Ensure you have the correct carrier – pets are required to travel in an appropriate cage according to its size and weight. The requirements will differ depending on your airline.

ONCE YOU LAND

Clinical examination and document check – after arrival a quarantine officer will verify your pet’s veterinary health certificate and vaccination records. Additionally, your pet will have a clinical examination/quarantine observation to ensure your pet is healthy and disease free. If your pet is free from any clinical illness as well as the documents including veterinary certificate/ vaccination records are found in order, quarantine isn’t usually required. However, if the pet is detected with any signs of clinical illness during inspection, then they will be placed in quarantine.

FLIGHT OPTIONS

Accompanied cargo / in the cabin – this is only an option for those of you who are flying with assistant animals, and if your chosen airline allows this.

Manifest cargo – unless your pet is an emotional support animal, they will need to travel as manifest cargo. Manifest cargo is a system wherein the import of pet is done using the airline cargo. If the pet is being transported in this manner, the documents must include of copy of the passport of the owner/caretaker, a copy of the owner/caretaker’s e-ticket and a copy of the air way bill.

Private charter – if you and your pet are flying into the UK on a private aircraft, you must enter at Biggin Hill, Blackpool, Cambridge, Doncaster, Farmborough, Sheffield, Stansted, London Ashford or London Oxford. This is only allowed if your private charter is approved to transport live animals to these airports.


What airlines allow flying a pets to the UK?

Most airlines allow flying pets to the UK. However, depending on the airline you fly with, pet policies differ.

When flying with a pet, it’s important to check airline pet policies before booking any travel. Different airline’s have different rules for flying with pets, including which breeds are allowed, the size and weight of pets that are permitted, and the number of pets they allow. Fees also vary between airlines.

Most airlines will allow pets to fly in the cargo section of their planes, in a climate controlled, comfortable pet zone. Although some pet owners think this will be stressful for their pets, it can actually be a lot calmer than flying in the cabin.

Some airlines will allow pets to fly in the cabin with their owners, but generally only small dogs and cats that weigh under 8kg are permitted. This is because they must fly inside an airline-approved carrier that fits under the seat in front of their owners. This isn’t permitted when flying pets in the UK, unless your dog, cat or ferret is a registered assistant animal and your airline approves this.

For a list of airlines that allow pets to fly in the cabin with their owners, check:

For a list of airlines that allow other pets on their planes, check: 


Guidelines for Pet Carriers

If you are flying to the UK with a pet, it is important that you use a pet carrier that is approved by your airline. Different airlines have different pet carrier policies, which often vary between aircrafts and routes. Check that your pet carrier is approved for your chosen airline, aircraft and route. 

The rules and regulations have been set out by International Air Transport Association (IATA) ensure that pets are comfortable when travelling. Thus, inside their travel carriers, pets must be able to stand up, turn around and lie down in a natural position in their kennel (without touching any side or the top of the container).

iata carrier guidelines

Furthermore, the rules for pet carriers also vary depending on whether your pet will be flying in the cabin or cargo area of the plane.

If you are travelling in the cabin with your dog or cat, then you will need to ensure that the carrier fits under the seat in front of you. This is why, generally, only small dogs and cats weighing under 7-8kg are permitted in the cabin.

Additionally, if traveling with a pet in the cabin, airlines often require that he or she is be obedient to your commands and can behave appropriately in public. Thus, he mustn’t bark or growl at other passengers or staff. If your dog does not behave in an appropriate manner, some airlines may transfer him to the cargo hold at an additional cost, or refuse to transport him all together. Some airlines require a consent form to ensure your pet is flight-ready.

MOST AIRLINES ONLY ACCEPT CAGES THAT COMPLY WITH THE FOLLOWING IATA REGULATIONS:

  • The cage must not have wheels
  • It must have a solid roof
  • The screws and nuts that hold the lower and upper parts of the cage must be properly installed and tightened – because yes, the cage must consist of two sections, made of solid and rigid plastic
  • The cage must also include bowls firmly attached to its lower wall containing food and water
  • It must be clean, but also and above all waterproof and covered with materials capable of absorbing liquid materials
  • It must be well ventilated, with openings in all 4 sides of the cage
  • The cage must also be properly closed, using a lock that cannot be opened from the inside
  • Finally, it must bear a label distinguishing the top from the bottom and another indicating that the cage contains a live animal

For a list of airlines that allow dogs to fly in the cabin with their owners, check 13 Airlines That Allow Flying With Dogs In-Cabin [2022 Prices & Policies].


How much does a UK Pet Passport cost in 2022?

The cost of a UK Pet Passport can vary drastically. The price you pay will depend on the following:

  • Your home country
  • Where you are traveling to
  • The veterinary clinic that you visit
  • The species of your pet
  • Whether your pet already has a microchip and rabies vaccination

Firstly, different countries and veterinary clinics will have different prices for veterinary treatments and vaccinations. If you want to save some money, check the prices of a few different veterinary clinics.

Additionally, some pets species may require more treatments and vaccines than others. For example, dogs require more vaccinations than cats, when traveling to the UK. Alternatively, rodents, rabbits, reptiles and amphibians do not require any vaccinations.

If your pet already has a microchip, and a recent rabies vaccination, you will probably pay less for your UK pet passport. Generally, a microchip and rabies vaccination both costs between $20-60 each, in the USA.

The cost of bringing a dog to the UK is broken down into the following (USD):

  1. Microchipping – $20-50
  2. Rabies vaccination – $20-50
  3. Health certificate – $25-150
  4. Tapeworm treatment – $3-15
  5. Pet air ticket – $1000-4000 (depends where you are traveling from and the weight/size of your puppy)
  6. Document endorsement – $38 per endorsement
  7. Pet crate – $20-100+

Frequently Asked Questions [FAQs]

What are the requirements to return to UK after travel?

The same requirements apply to dogs, ferrets or cats that originated from the UK. Thus, your dog or cat will need a microchip, proof of current rabies vaccination, parasite treatments, a health certificate, and licenses.

Can my pet travel to the UK with an EU Pet Passport?

An EU Pet Passport permits pets to travel to EU countries and listed non-EU countries without having to face quarantine. As long as your pet is microchipped and their rabies vaccinations are up to date, you can use an EU Pet Passport to travel to the UK. You may just require additional documents, such as proof of tapeworm treatments for dogs, and an import permit.

Can I bring my puppy or kitten to the UK?

Yes, however they must be older than 4 months old. Dogs and cats under the age of 3 months are not permitted to enter the UK. Additionally, your dog or cat will need a rabies vaccination, after which you will likely need to wait 21 days before entering the UK.

Can I relocate to the UK with my pet?

Yes, many people relocate to the UK each year. As long as you follow the guidelines above then moving to the UK with a pet should be simple. This means, making sure that your pet has any required vaccinations and has all the documents required to enter the country.


Importing Dogs or Cats to the UK (GB) from Malaysia

If your dog or cat is entering the UK (GB) from peninsular Malaysia, the following conditions must be met:

1. Your pet has had no contact with pigs during at least the past 60 days prior to export.
2. Your pet has not lived in a place where cases of Nipah disease have been confirmed during the past 60 days.
3. Your pet has been tested with negative a result to an IgG capture ELISA test carried out in a laboratory approved for testing for Nipah disease viruses within 10 days of export.


Bottom Line

Bringing pets to the UK (GB) can be a little complicated. Firstly, your pet (dogs, ferrets and cats) will require a microchip. They will also need a valid rabies vaccination, administered no sooner than 21 days before entering the UK, and either a pet passport or animal health certificate. Pet species other than dogs, ferrets and cats will not require microchipping or a rabies vaccination, however you may require a health certificate and/or an import permit.

When organising travel, ensure that your chosen airline allows your pet to fly on their planes and that you have an appropriate and approved pet carrier. Airlines have strict regulations when it comes to pet crates.

Quarantine in the UK is not common, however if your pet is shown to have any signs of disease upon clinical inspection, they will be quarantined. Rabbits and rodents will usually need to stay in quarantine for 4 months. 

Hope you have found this helpful – happy travels!

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